[cs_content][cs_section parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_image type=”none” src=”http://longanbachfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/125px-Flagge_K__nigreich_W__rttemberg.svg_.png” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=”” class=”alignright” style=”width: 200px;padding-top: 25px;”][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_image type=”none” src=”http://longanbachfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/85px-Coat_of_Arms_of_the_Kingdom_of_W__rttemberg__1817.svg_.png” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=”” class=”alignleft” style=”width:150px;”][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][cs_section parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px;”][cs_text]

A brief history of the Kingdom of Wurttemburg

The Kingdom of Wurttemberg was a state in Germany that existed from 1806 to 1918, located in the area that is now Baden-Wurttemberg. The Kingdom was a continuation of the Duchy of Wurttemberg, which existed from 1495 to 1806. Prior to 1495, the ruling house of Wurttemberg had consisted of counts ruling only a fragment of the Duchy of Swabia, which had dissolved after the death of Duke Conradin in 1268.

Frederick II

Once a Duchy within the Holy Roman Empire, on January 1, 1806, Duke Frederick II assumed the title of King from Frederick I, abrogated the constitution and united old and new Wurttemberg. Subsequently, he placed the property of the church under the control of the Kingdom, whose boundaries were also greatly extended by the process of mediasation

In 1806, Frederick joined the Confederation of the Rhine and received further additions of territory with 160,000 inhabitants. Later, by the Peace of Vienna of October 1809, about 110,000 more people came under his rule. In return for these favours, Frederick joined French Empoeror Napoleon I in his campaigns against Prussia, Austria and Russia. Of the 16,000 of his subjects who marched to Moscow, only a few hundred returned. After the Battle of Leipzig in October 1813, King Frederick deserted the French Emperor, and by a treaty with Metternich at Fulda in November 1813, he secured the confirmation of his royal title and of his recent acquisitions of territory, while his troops marched with those of the allies into France. In 1815, the King joined the German Confederation, but the Congress of Vienna made no change to the extent of his lands. In the same year, he laid before the representatives of his peple the outline of a new constitution, but they rejected it, and in the midst of the commotion that ensued, Frederick died on October 30, 1816.

William I

He was succeeded by his son, William I (reigned 1816-1864), who after much discussion, granted a new constitution in September 1819. This constitution, with subsequent modifications, remained in force until 1918. The desire for greater political freedom did not entirely fade under the constitution of 1819, and after 1830, some transitory unrest occurred.

A period of quiet set in, and the condition of the kingdom, its education, its agriculture, its trade and economy improved. Both in public and in private matters, William’s frugality helped to repair the country’s shattered finances. The inclusion of Wurttemberg in the German Zollverein and the construction of railways fostered trade.

The revolutionary movement of 1848 did not leave Wurttemberg untouched, although no violence took place in the territory. William had to dismiss Johannes Schlayer (1792-1860) and his other ministers, and call to power men with more liberal ideas, proponents of united Germany. William proclaimed a democratic constitution, but as soon as the movement had spent its force he dismissed the liberal ministers, and in October 1849, Schlayer and his associates returned to power. By interfering with popular electoral rights, the king and his ministers succeeded in assembling a servile diet in 1851 that surrendered the privileges gained since 1848. In this the authorities restored the constitution of 1819, and power passed into bureaucratic hands. A concordat with the papacy proved almost the last act of William’s long reign, but the diet repudiated the agreement.

Charles I

In July 1864, Charles I (1823-1891, reigned 1864-1891) succeeded his father William as king and almost at once had to face considerable difficulties. In the competition between Austria and Prussia for supremacy in Germany, William had consistently taken the Austrian side, and the new king continued this policy. In 1866, Wurttemberg took up arms on behalf of Austria in the Austro-Prussian War, but three weeks after the Battle of Koniggratz (3 July 1866), the allies suffered a comprehensive defeat at Tauberbischofsheim, and the country lay at Prussia’s mercy. The Prussians occupied the northern part of Wurttemberg and negotiated a peace in August 1866; Wurttemberg paid an indemnity of 8,000,000 gulden and concluded a secret offensive and defensive treaty with her conqueror. Wurttemberg was a party to the St. Petersburg Declaration of 1868.

The end of the struggle against Prussia allowed a renewal of democratic agitation in Wurttemberg, but this had achieved no tangible results when the great war between France and Prussia broke out in 1870. Although Wurttemberg had continued to be antagonistic to Prussia, the Kingdom shared in the national enthusiasm which swept over Germany, and its troops took a creditable part in the Battle of Worth and in other operations of the war. In 1871, Wurttemberg became a member of the new German Empire, but retained control of her own post office, telegraphs and railways. She also had certain privileges with regard to taxation and the army. For the next ten years, Wurttemberg enthusiastically supported the new order. Many important reforms ensued, especially in the area of finance, but a proposal to unify the rail syatem with that of the rest of Germany failed. After reductions in taxation in 1889, changes to the constitution were considered. Charles wished to strengthen the conservtive element in the chambers, but the laws of 1874, 1876 and 1879 only effected slight changes.

William II

On October 6, 1891, King Charles died suddenly; his nephew, William II (1848-1921, reigned 1891-1918), succeeded him and continued Charles policies.

Constitutional discussions continued, and the election of 1895 memorably returned a powerful party of democrats. William had no sons, nor had his only Protestant kinsman, Duke Nicholas (1833-1903); Consequently power was scheduled to pass to a Roman Catholic branch of the family, raising difficulties about the relations between church and state. As of 1910 the heir to the throne was Duke Albert (b. 1865) of the Altshausen family.

An elder Catholic line, the Urach, was bypassed due to a morganatic marriage contracted in 1800. A Protestant morganatic line included Mary of Teck who married George V of the United Kingdom.

Between 1900 and 1910 the political history of Wurtemberg centered around constitutional and educational questions. The constitution underwent revision in 1906 and improvements to the educational system were made in 1909. In 1904 the Wurttemberg railway system integrated with that of the rest of Germany.
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Kingdom of Wurttemberg within the German Empire before 1918

  The First World War, King William abdicated on 30 November 1918. The Kingdom was replaced by the Free People’s State of Wurttemberg. After World War II, Wurttemberg was divided between the United States and French occupation zones and became part of two new states; Wurttemberg-Baden and Wurttemberg-Hohenzollern. After the Federal Republic of Germany was formed in 1949, these two states merged with Baden in 1952 to become the modern German state of Baden-Wurttemberg.[/cs_text][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][cs_section parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/5″ class=”cs-ta-center” style=”padding: 0px;”][x_image type=”none” src=”http://longanbachfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Wappen_Voehringen_Wuerttemberg.png” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=”” style=”width: 350px;”][cs_text class=”cs-ta-center”]Voehringen Coat of Arms[/cs_text][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”3/5″ style=”padding: 0px;”][cs_text]

Voehringen

Vohringen was first mentioned historically in a deed of donation by the monestary Lorsche on a mountain road 19May 772. The Lord of Vohringen was of the Teck Dynasty. Under their rule, a castle was built on the Burghalde in Vohringen. In 1306 Vohringen was mentioned as being a part of the Wurttemberg Kingdom. In 1463, a larger church was built and dedicated to St. Peter.
In 1634 Vohringen was afflicted with marauding warriors. Then for decades the town suffered from billeting of soldiers. 100 years later, Vohringen citizens marched with Napolean into Russia. Famine struck in 1816. Crop failures and inflation in the 1840s forced many to emmigrate to Prussia, Russia and to America.[/cs_text][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/5″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_image type=”none” src=”http://longanbachfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/560px-Wappen_Landkreis_Rottweil.svg_.png” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][cs_text class=”cs-ta-center”]Rottweil District Coat of Arms
[/cs_text][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][cs_section parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_image type=”none” src=”http://longanbachfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/6abe34fbd3.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][cs_text]

Muhlbach Bridge

[/cs_text][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_image type=”none” src=”http://longanbachfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/eabb67f1fe.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][cs_text]

Center of Vohringen

[/cs_text][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_image type=”none” src=”http://longanbachfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/22d02828d2.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][cs_text]

Parish Road

[/cs_text][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][cs_section parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_custom_headline level=”h2″ accent=”false” class=”cs-ta-center mtn”]Langenbach History and Meaning[/x_custom_headline][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][cs_section parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ style=”margin: 0px;padding: 0px 0px 45px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_image type=”none” src=”http://longanbachfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Langenbach_Coat_of_Arms.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=”” style=”width: 350px;”][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][cs_text]The German word Bach (brook) is joined with a adjective Lang (long) with a dative ending, likely reflecting an origin in some prepositional phrase such as am Langen Bach ( on the long brook) which may have meant a village on a long brook or that it meant a village that stretched for a long way along a brook. Historical records also yield forms oberlangenbach and niederlangenbach, which shows that there were once two villages, side by side, with one lying upstream from the other. The prefixes mean upper and lower. The area that this Langenbach is located dates back to 1445-1446.

On the eastern slope south of the village center, remnants of a settlement have been unearthed. It is believed to have been an estate dating back to the Gallo-Roman times.[/cs_text][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][cs_section parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px;”][cs_text]

Gender Specific Surname Variants

Traditionally, there was a differentiation of surnames of women from those of their male siblings. This practice was widespread in Germany until the 18th century. In old records, especially church registers such as baptisms, deaths and marriages, women may appear bearing regionally typical surname variants ( like in South Germany: Georg Langenbacher, but Anna Langenbacherin). With the establishment of general official registration of legal names, this practice was abolished in the 18th and the 19th centuries, depending on the legislation of the respecting states.

Surname variants for women continue to appear in some German dialects. In Bavarian dialect surnames of women sometimes are formed adding the ending “-in” used in standard High German to indicate noun variants for women or items of grammatical feminine gender such as Naherin (seamstress), with Naher (seamster) being the male form. In West Low German parlance the ending “…sch(e)” is sometimes added to surnames of women, related to the standard High German adjective ending “…isch” to nouns or adjectives indicating blonging/pertaining to, being of the kind described by the suffixed word: for example, de Smidtsche, is Ms. Schmidt (Smith). Another form, indicating a female bearer of a surname, was the addition of a genitive “s”, the daughter or wife of Mr. Backer (Baker) would appear as Ms. Backers (in German without an apostrophe), as being Backers daughter or wife.[/cs_text][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][/cs_content]

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